mypubliclands
mypubliclands:

Historically, several human cultures have tried to carve a living from Ojito’s rugged terrain, rocky soils and scarce water supply. Although several types of ruins exist within the area, including those of the Anasazi, Navajo, and Hispanic cultures, very few historical records exist concerning their lives here.
Fossil remains of rare dinosaurs, plants and trees have been discovered in the Ojito Wilderness (New Mexico). They are found in the 150 million-year-old Jurassic Age Morrison Formation. Because these fossil remains of plants and animals provide critical information about life during this period, it is very important that they remain undisturbed in place until they can be collected and studied by professional paleontologists. Collection of these fossils is prohibited unless authorized by permit.
Deep meandering arroyos offer miles of terrain in which to wander. Rock layers in the canyon walls and cliffs enhance sightseeing and photography. Hiking, backpacking, sightseeing and horseback riding, to name a few, can all be enjoyed without a permit in this remote, secluded area. Primitive camping is also allowed, but permits are required for most other uses (for example, outfitting/guiding or commercial filming).
Learn more: on.doi.gov/1gMNVYh
Photo by Bob Wick, BLM 

mypubliclands:

Historically, several human cultures have tried to carve a living from Ojito’s rugged terrain, rocky soils and scarce water supply. Although several types of ruins exist within the area, including those of the Anasazi, Navajo, and Hispanic cultures, very few historical records exist concerning their lives here.

Fossil remains of rare dinosaurs, plants and trees have been discovered in the Ojito Wilderness (New Mexico). They are found in the 150 million-year-old Jurassic Age Morrison Formation. Because these fossil remains of plants and animals provide critical information about life during this period, it is very important that they remain undisturbed in place until they can be collected and studied by professional paleontologists. Collection of these fossils is prohibited unless authorized by permit.

Deep meandering arroyos offer miles of terrain in which to wander. Rock layers in the canyon walls and cliffs enhance sightseeing and photography. Hiking, backpacking, sightseeing and horseback riding, to name a few, can all be enjoyed without a permit in this remote, secluded area. Primitive camping is also allowed, but permits are required for most other uses (for example, outfitting/guiding or commercial filming).

Learn more: on.doi.gov/1gMNVYh

Photo by Bob Wick, BLM 

npsparkclp

npsparkclp:

Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary:

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail

The history of European settlement in the United States is traditionally told as an east-to-west journey.

A bi-national trail arches gently over the middle of the North American continent from Mexico City through the central highlands of Mexico to Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan) Pueblo, New Mexico, tracing a path towards another perspective of the European settlement story. The El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, designated as a National Historic Trail in 2000, emphasizes the shared history and heritage of Spain, Mexico, and the American Southwest in early settlement patterns of the United States.   

 This August, the National Park Service announced its new online El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary. The itinerary provides historical and cultural information, images, maps, and essays to help connect and distinguish the 17 historic sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places  The journey over the Spanish Colonial “royal road of the interior” represents three centuries of cultural heritage and interactions, elements of which continue to persist in the present-day landscape and inhabitants.

 The El Camino Real itinerary is the 58th in the online Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary Series, which supports historic preservation, promotes public awareness of history, and encourages visits to historic places throughout the country. The National Park Service’s Heritage Education Services and its National Trails Intermountain Region produced this travel itinerary in partnership with the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers.

   

 

mypubliclands

mypubliclands:

The Bisti Beast: #bornwild on BLM’s National Conservation Lands 

To celebrate the anniversary of the Wilderness Act, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. is showcasing a photography exhibit highlighting the beauty, diversity and longevity of America’s wilderness. The Wilderness Forever: 50 Years of Protecting America’s Wild Places exhibit opened today, September 3, 2014.

Upon entrance to the exhibit hall, visitors are greeted by the Bisti Beast, a dinosaur skull on loan from the BLM to the Smithsonian. The partial skeleton was discovered in 1997, by a volunteer fossil researcher named Paul Sealey, during a weekend excursion in the 40,000-acre Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness in northwestern New Mexico.

After working with the BLM to secure permits, a paleontological team planned the first-ever excavation on wilderness land. All the tools required were carried to the site by hand. For the specimen’s final removal from Bisti/De-Na-Zin in summer 1998, the New Mexico Army National Guard airlifted the pieces out of the wilderness via helicopter. 

The Bisti Beast was officially named after the volunteer who discovered it: Bistahieversor sealeyi—a combination of Greek and Navajo words that means “Sealey’s Destroyer of the Badlands.” 

As the most visited natural history museum in the world, up to six million visitors may visit the Wilderness Forever exhibit and meet the Bisti Beast. For more information visit: https://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/ 

Story and exhibit photos by Lissa Eng, public affairs specialist, BLM National Office